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Cancer 101 Toolkit for First Nations, Inuit and Métis People

The Cancer 101 Toolkit provides basic cancer information for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. You can use it to learn or help others learn about cancer, and how to prevent and treat it.

Cancer and Screening Toolkit

The toolkit helps people talk with their healthcare providers about cancer screening. It has culturally appropriate cancer information for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people, and their healthcare providers. It also covers the colorectal, breast and cervical screening programs in Ontario.

Front Cover
What is Cancer & Cancer Screening
Cervical Screening
Breast Screening
Colon Screening
Treatment & Prevention
Back Cover

First Nations

Fact sheets

What is Cancer?

Quit Smoking

Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Cancer Treatment

Environment, Heredity and Cancer

Flash cards

Check-Up for Prevention

Stages of Cancer

Screening Q&A

Activity and Exercise

Drinking Alcohol

Healthy Weight – Eat Right

Video

Cancer 101 Whiteboard

Learn about basic cancer information, and get answers to many common questions about cancer. This video is produced for First Nations people, by Cancer Care Ontario. It was developed in collaboration with CAREX Canada, the Occupational Cancer Research Centre and the Canadian Cancer Society. A special thanks to Stan Wesley for the narration and the Blue Storm Singers for the music.

Inuit

Fact sheets

What is Cancer?

Quit Smoking

Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Cancer Treatment

Environment, Heredity and Cancer

Flash cards

Check-Up for Prevention

Stages of Cancer

Screening Q&A

Activity and Exercise

Drinking Alcohol

Healthy Weight – Eat Right

Videos

Living with cancer: an Inuit caregiver story

Jennifer Long, an Inuit, shares her story about caring for her mother, who was diagnosed with colon cancer. Their story shows the unique challenges Inuit face with cancer, mainly in understanding treatment options, and accessing services and supports in the community. Jennifer shares the need for emotional support for both patients and caregivers, and the Inuit view of wellness.

An Inuit Elder’s story on living a healthy life

Susanna Singoorie, an Inuit elder, shares her story about living a healthy life. Until recently, the commonly used word for “cancer” in Inuktitut means a “disease without a cure.” But new words for cancer have been developed for cancer in each of the Inuit regions: In Nunavut, Ippinnaittulijuq (Ikpinnaittulijuq) means “something you do not feel until after the fact.” This reflects a shift in how people view cancer, from an incurable disease to one that can be prevented and managed, with better quality of life.

Métis

Fact sheets

What is Cancer?

Quit Smoking

Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Cancer Treatment

Environment, Heredity and Cancer

Flash cards

Check-Up for Prevention

Stages of Cancer

Screening Q&A

Activity and Exercise

Drinking Alcohol

Healthy Weight – Eat Right

Video

Métis Cancer Survivor Story

Tim is a Métis Nation of Ontario citizen and was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2012. After discussing his options with his healthcare provider, Tim had 10 months of treatment in his home community of Thunder Bay and in Toronto. Tim is now cancer free and still a very active Métis citizen. He is a community volunteer and executive member of the Provisional Council of the Métis Nation of Ontario. The Métis Nation of Ontario and Cancer Care Ontario are deeply grateful to Tim and his family for their generosity and courage in sharing Tim’s cancer story.